PEAK PERFORMANCE IS NOW...

Female training

in Base endurance training

The “rap sheet” on female athletes says that they don’t recover from hard training as well as males do. This ‘slur’ on females does make a certain amount of physiological sense. After all, the primary male sex hormone, testosterone, is a potent bone and muscle builder and connective-tissue-reconstructor. Oestrogen, the main female hormone, has more... MORE

Female and male performance times

in Base endurance training

Female and male athletes seem to respond to training in a comparable manner. As the quantity or intensity of training increases, aerobic capacity (VO2max) shoots upward, body fat tends to decrease, and performance improves, regardless of gender. In spite of these parallel responses, males frequently achieve better performance times than similarly trained females. Part of... MORE

Mitochondria Functions and Research

in Base endurance training

More mitochondria mean more PBs, but what do you have to do to get them? Deep inside your muscles lurk a multitude of microscopic structures called mitochondria. Although infinitesimally small (they can’t be seen with an ordinary microscope), the mitochondria are of major importance to your athletic efforts; as you increase their density, your performance... MORE

Treadmill training

in Base endurance training

Treadmill training: In mid-May, newspaper headlines trumpeted the news: treadmills are the best exercise device for individuals interested in burning calories and losing weight, beating stationary bicycles, stair machines, rowing devices, and cross-country ski machines by a whopping margin. As a result, people who trained in gyms and clubs began to cast a cold eye... MORE

Running at max capacity

in Base endurance training

This new research confirms that the also-rans are working every bit as hard as the winners A popular maxim among runners is that ‘back-of-the-pack’ individuals work just as hard as the front-runners during a race. The accepted belief is that the divergence in performances is not due to the effort exerted – but to differences... MORE

Running economy

in Base endurance training

Turning your attention inwards can help you run more economically. Extensive research has been carried out on both psychological and physiological factors associated with distance running. For example, sports psychologists have investigated the relationship of anxiety and confidence to running achievement, while physiologists have examined factors such as VO2max and lactate threshold, relating these to... MORE

The ‘slow component’ of VO2 – understand it to...

in Base endurance training

Practical recommendations for reducing the impact of the VO2 slow component Article at a glance The traditional way of classifying ‘exercise intensity’ is discussed; The concept of exercise intensity ‘domains’ is introduced; The VO2 ‘slow component’ is described and its importance to exercise performance is explained; Practical recommendations for reducing the impact of the VO2... MORE

The aerobic and anaerobic energy systems

in Base endurance training

Training the right energy system in relation to your sport will ensure optimum performance. By John Shepherd. The three energy systems 1) Aerobic energy system Distance running uses aerobic energy Aerobic means ‘with air’. Oxygen provides the catalyst for a chemical reaction in our muscles (including the heart) that generates aerobic energy. If it were... MORE

Sports nutrition: the latest research into low glycogen training

in Base endurance training

Could training when muscle carbohydrate stores are low be advantageous to athletes? Andrew Hamilton looks at the very latest research in this area and how it translates into training recommendations for athletes… When it was first proposed as a useful nutritional approach to training, the ‘train low, race high’ theory ruffled plenty of feathers because... MORE


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