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Coping with emotions

Sport psychology: take mental charge of your performance

in Coping with emotions

Owen Anderson explains how athletes can harness sports psychology to overcome stress in sport and maximise performance Mental stress can hurt your performances in a variety of different ways. It can raise heart rate and oxygen consumption, harming your exercise efficiency and causing particular workout and race speeds to feel tougher than they actually should.... MORE

Sports psychology: stress management in sport

in Coping with emotions

How athletes can avoid emotional burnout in sport Athletics coaches are constantly experimenting on their athletes, whether consciously or not, by seeing how much training they can take. Up to a certain level the athlete improves in performance, to a measurable extent, but there eventually comes a point when the training is too much. The... MORE

Sports Psychology: Maintaining emotional control in competitions

in Coping with emotions

Competition & Emotional Control Here are some pre-performance strategies for taking control of your emotions before they take control of you. Competition can bring out the best or the worst in athletes, and the psychological demands are especially high when individuals or teams are striving to achieve the same goals. When physical skills are evenly... MORE

Sports psychology: train your mind to take control

in Coping with emotions

Endurance performance is mentally tough; the best athletes can push themselves to sustain physical fatigue and remain psychologically positive over long distances and durations. But according to PP contributor Andy Lane, this doesn’t happen by chance; endurance athletes can train the mind to develop emotional control Emotional control is a skill needed to cope with... MORE

Sport Motivation

in Coping with emotions

To create a positive motivational climate you need more carrot than stick The motivation for participating in sport and striving for improvement is likely to vary considerably from person to person. Indeed, most people have multiple motives rather than single reasons. For example, a tennis player might be attending individual coaching sessions to improve her... MORE


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