PEAK PERFORMANCE IS NOW...

Techniques

Fast pedalling

in Techniques

Why fast pedalling makes cyclists more efficient RECENTLY we reported that cyclists are usually more efficient on both hills and flat terrain when they pedal quickly (at about 80-85 rpm) rather than at slower cadences. Now, a new study suggests that the greater efficiency may be related to the rapid rate at which glycogen is... MORE

Quantifying intensity

in Techniques

How to use heart rate to quantify your fitness training intensity Articles in PP often detail elite and complex aerobic training methods to boost endurance performance, VO2max and lactate threshold. These articles typically refer to target training intensities and heart rates to achieve, say, a new 10K or marathon best; they recommend high-intensity training, with... MORE

How you can become a better runner without increased...

in Techniques

Is there really such a thing as ‘good running form’? Coaches preach relentlessly about proper form, and runners classify other competitors as having ‘good’ or ‘bad’ mechanics, yet scientific research has shown that first-class form is an extremely elusive quality.  In fact, investigations reveal that when you give a runner a ‘form make-over’ which forces... MORE

Breathing techniques in running

in Techniques

If you let your mind control your heart, you can improve your performances Can your mind make you a better athlete? Sports psychologists believe that the way you think, your ability to relax, the manner in which you regulate your state of arousal, and your confidence, concentration, and determination all help determine how well you... MORE

Overspeed training

in Techniques

Does making your legs work faster than normal actually make you a quicker athlete? Exercise scientists and athletes have debated the benefits of treadmill workouts ever since the device became popular. Currently, the consensus is that the treadmill can provide runners with an extremely intense, very controlled training session (the extra control comes from the... MORE

Swim-benches

in Techniques

Another mechanical ergogenic aid to training is the swim-bench A quick glance at most swimming magazines will reveal ads for these pieces of equipment. Their use to clubs and competitive swimmers is very much a topic of current debate in sports science. Although swimming strokes each involve a unique, integrated pattern of neuro-muscular and joint... MORE

Cycling uphill

in Techniques

Should uphill cyclists stand or sit? It’s common practice for cyclists to stand on the pedals during hill climbs. However, few studies have investigated physiological responses of different body positions for competitive cyclists riding on inclines. Some research has found that cyclists were able to attain a higher VO2max on a cycle ergometer when they... MORE

Methods, fitness, lung function

in Techniques

A critical look at recent research into training methods, fitness needs and lung function Rowing poses something of a unique challenge to the human body at the highest competitive levels, illustrated by the apparent natural selection of individuals most suited to the sport. The demands of top-level performance include enormous local (muscular) and general (cardiovascular)... MORE

Noel Frost – endurance training for rowing

in Techniques

In late 1996, at the age of 57, Noel Frost set two rowing world records in his sector – 55-59 male (heavy) – for the 30- and 60-minute distances. Here he describes months 2 and 3 of the training programme that led to the achievement I believe endurance training is similar for many sports in... MORE

Understanding biomechanics for core stability training

in Techniques

Reduce your risk of injury in core stability training  In the sports fitness industry we have probably been seduced by more fads than any other industry.  They seem to come and go so quickly you can hardly remember the last one.  Is core stability training one of those fads or is it here to stay?... MORE


Follow us